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Archived Posts from “Ireland”

Visiting Dublin

12

November

“In Dublin’s fair city where the girls are so pretty I first laid my eyes on sweet Molly Malone. She wheeled her wheelbarrow through streets broad and narrow, singing cockles and mussels, alive a live O.”

Dublin on the East Coast of Ireland has come a long way since Molly Malone was immortalized in the famous song and has now become a statue close to the Main shopping area of Grafton Street. Erected to commemorate Dublin’s own millennium, a statue of Molly Malone pensively stares at passers-by on the southern end of Grafton Street. Ever ready for a comic put-down, Dubliners immediately christened the well-endowed Molly “the tart with the cart.”

Dublin is now one of Europe’s premier locations. Ireland in general has embraced the common European community but is still quintessentially Irish. Whether you visit Dublin for business or pleasure make some time to explore this wonderful city. It is both modern and energetic with its old traditions are all around.

Dublin’s coastline, wild willful and rugged, can be explored by bus or train journey from the City Centre. The Irish people’s Celtic heritage thrives in their creative spirit and love of music. The pubs around Dublin are full of life and everywhere you go you will experience the warmth, charm and gentle humor of the inhabitants of this tiny land with a turbulent history.

Dublin founded in the 9th Century by the Vikings is split in two by the River Liffey and hosts great rivalry between the inhabitants on both sides of the river. The two main bridges are O’Connell Bridge and the Ha’penny Bridge, so called because of the toll which used to be charged to cross it. O’Connell Bridge takes you to O’Connell Street home of the historic General Post Office, the first building to fly the Irish flag during the Easter Rebellion of 1916. The National Gallery of Ireland is one of the finest in Europe with one whole exhibit devoted to the works of J.B. Yeats brother of the poet W.B. Yeats. Take a stroll round St. Stephens Green before heading to Grafton Street one of Dublin’s most stylish shopping streets. Grafton Street is home to street artists and musicians and has a wonderful atmosphere.

Take some time to visit Trinity College, the oldest university in Western Europe founded in 1592. The university houses the Long Room home to the Book of Kells. The Book of Kells is one of Dublin’s most popular and significant visitor attractions. Dating back to around 800AD, it is considered to be one of the most beautiful religious manuscripts in the world. Written on vellum, it contains a Latin text of the four gospels in script accompanied by whole pages of detailed illustration. The book has been on display since the 19th century and has the dubious honor of having been defaced by Queen Victoria. A decorated page and a page of script can normally be seen when you visit.

The library contains busts of some of its most famous scholars many of them writers and intellectuals. One of its most famous students was Jonathon Swift who wrote “Gulliver’s Travels”. Swift later went on to become Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral another must visit on your list. St. Patrick’s Cathedral was built in the 12th Century and beautifully restored with money provided by the Guinness Family one of Ireland’s most famous families.

The Guinness brewery was founded in 1759 by Arthur Guinness and is now the largest brewery in the World. No visit to Dublin would be complete without tasting the “black stuff” first hand. To many, Guinness is one of the most important features of Ireland. With 300 million pints exported every year, it is no surprise to learn that Ireland is the world’s leading beer exporter. Completed at the cost of IR£30 million, the Guinness Storehouse is a fine addition to Dublin’s ever-growing list of purpose-built attractions. Set inside a converted 18th century fermentation building, it comprises of six floors linked by a giant atrium in the shape of a pint glass. Although the actual brewery is not open to the public, the storehouse’s new exhibition space outlines the 200-year history of the company and reveals many brewing secrets. The models and displays of the exhibition are followed by a short film and a glass of the famous brew.

If your schedule allows there are some interesting day trips which you can take from Dublin. To the North West is the Boyne Valley. There is historical evidence in this area dating back to 6000 B.C. New Grange passage is said to be the oldest man made structure in the world dating to 3000 B.C. The Wicklow Mountains to the south of Dublin are sparsely populated and enjoy a slow pace of life. The monastic settlement of Glendalough in the middle of the valley dates to the 6th Century. Founded by St. Kevin this is a powerful, peaceful, beautiful place and well worth a visit. You can take a trip to the Curragh of Kildare for a flutter on the horses. The Curragh consists of 4000 acres and is home to over 60 race horse trainers. It has produced some of the most expensive race horses in the world with prices running into 7 figures.

All in all you will have a wonderful and energetic time in Dublin. Be prepared to walk as it is very easy to get around on foot. And you will need to walk off those Irish breakfasts, with bacon, sausage, black and white pudding, eggs, soda bread and pots of delicious Irish tea. Hmmm!!!…..

“Go N’eirigh an bother leat” and have a wonderful time in the Capital of the Emerald Isle.

About The Author
Fionn Downhill is President of Four Corners Hotels offering discount hotels around the world. http://www.fourcornershotels.com.


Travelling to and within Ireland

05

November

To enjoy travelling in Ireland one has to have first travelled to Ireland. As Ireland is an island nation, travelling to Ireland means arriving by either air or sea. One also has to consider the modes of transport on offer to travel around this wonderful country.

If you intend to arrive by air, you will enter the country through one of four airports. For visitors arriving on flights directly from/through North America either Shannon or Dublin airports will be your destination. Shannon Airport due to its proximity to Cork & Kerry is the most ideal destination. Dublin Airport is Ireland’s biggest airport, serving the North Atlantic routes, Middle and Far Eastern routes and European routes. Regular shuttle flights are available between Dublin and both Cork and Kerry Airports. Cork Airport can be reached from many European destinations as well as from all over the world if you change flights at either London or Dublin. Cork Airport is, at the most, just two hours away from a stay in the Cork / Kerry region. Your final choice of arrival airport is Kerry Airport. Kerry Airport can be reached by flights from the U.K., or Düsseldorf. If you intend to arrive by sea, which is ideal for those who wish to use their own car, there is a choice of 3 ports of arrival. The closest port of arrival is Ringaskiddy, which is just outside Cork City. Next Rosslare, which is located in the southeast corner of Ireland and is suitable for those who prefer a shorter sea journey. Finally Dun Laoghaire just outside Dublin links with Holyhead in North Wales for visitors coming through from the Midlands and Northern England.

If you have arrived in Ireland by air or sea at Dublin / Dun Laoghaire or by sea at Rosslare, a comfortable way to travel onward to Cork or Kerry is by train (Iarnród Éireann). Kent station in Cork is less than 5 minutes walk from the city centre. It is also possible to change trains at Mallow to get to Millstreet, Killarney and Tralee. For Killarney and Tralee this will cost a small bit extra. Full timetables are posted at all stations. Travelling by bus (Bus Eireann) is a cheap way to get around Ireland and a great way to meet people. Often very lively conversations will develop during your journey, with plenty of advice given for your stay in Ireland. The Dublin Bus Navigator is useful for finding your way around the capital city. The cheapest way to travel by bus is to get a rambler ticket available from most bus stations. These give unlimited travel on all Scheduled services – excluding Day Tours. If you are travelling as a group of 10 people or more, then why not hire a coach for your stay in Ireland. This way you will be chauffeured day and night to you chosen destinations in safety and with no worries about who drinks and who does the driving! For complete travel independence a car is your best choice whether you bring your own or hire one. The roads in Ireland are uncluttered and once off the main National primary routes, roads are considered crowded if you see another car going in the same direction and one coming against you at the same time. For those who want to travel at a leisurely pace and enjoy the fresh air, Ireland is ideal cycling country. Bicycles can be hired nationwide. Finally hitchhiking is perfectly safe in Ireland, for those on a low budget this is an ideal way to get around and meet people. Getting a lift is quite easy, especially if you have the flag of your country sewn onto the back of your backpack and displayed so drivers can see it easily. Many local people in Ireland hitchhike so you will often have competition at the best locations for a lift, which is usually between the 30m.p.h., and 40m.p.h. signs on the road-leaving town.

Interested in this subject? Try this link for more of the same


What do you need to know about Ireland travel

05

November

Ireland is an exotic tourist spot. It is popularly known for the myths, magical incidents and legendary stories associated with it. Numerous tourists from all round the world are magnetized to view this bewitching place. The wonderful Ireland cities with a horde of interesting activities for young as well as the old and the scenic splendor with which the country is blessed have always been inviting people from all round the world. Ireland is thus deemed to be an ideal place for vacationing.

Ireland like many other places on earth has something for everyone. You can tour the place individually or with your family, there will be no deficiency of fun and amusement. For instance there are water and other sports for kids and adults, rock climbing for the teenagers and other enthusiasts, beaches, botanical gardens, museums, castles and all other attractions that are more than enough to keep you glued to the place.

Ireland is a country that has a rich culture and heritage. The reflection of the tradition of the place can be perceived in the lifestyle of Irish people residing in different Ireland cities.

1. Dublin is an eminent Irish city. It is regarded as the heart of Ireland for more than a few reasons. Dublin is a mirror to the Irish history. It has the many historical monuments that have preserved the priceless Georgian art and architecture. The Custom House, the Gate Theater and the Garden of Remembrance parade much of Georgian architecture. There are also many worth visiting modern art galleries and museums that add to the creative ambience of the place. Apart from this the nightlife of Dublin has always entertained its tourists to best and fullest.

2. The Irish Midlands are known by way of bifurcation into various provinces or counties. These counties are individually famous for some or the other attraction. For instance County Cavan has got recognition due to the River Shanon that flows towards its south, the Killygeen forests and the fascinating activities like fishing, horseback riding and hiking etc. in there. While the County Offaly is popular for its superb science center and ravishing plant and animal life.

3. Moving on to the Northern Ireland region, what is most welcoming here is the capital city of Belfast. Belfast is seen terms of its directions i.e. north, east, west and south Belfast. All the areas have respective allures. If south Belfast has beautiful Belfast gardens and the famous Ulster Museum, the north Belfast has amazing Neolithic caves in the Cave Hill Country Park and the Belfast zoo. Besides Belfast, there are several other counties of Northern Ireland region that have always gained tourist attention.

4. South Ireland area is again a combination of different counties. County Mayo here is a land of lakes and cliffs. This county has some remarkable historical sites that are often a source of information. The County Clarke of this region has multiple lures. There is fishing, boating, mind-boggling stalamites and stalactites in the caves of cliff of Moher, dance, music and theater. The Bunratty Folk Park adds to the amusement sources of this place.

5. Similarly there are other provinces like Northwestern County, which again is subdivided in a number of other counties, Southeastern and Southwestern Counties that too are sectioned in numerous counties.

Finally, Ireland is not just a destination for the rich. Accommodation and other facilities are available for all classes of people. A holiday to Ireland with planned budget can be a dream come true for many people.

About the Author

Mansi gupta writes about Ireland travel


Golf in Ireland

04

November

Golf in Ireland is a joy for sure and also one of the best ways to enjoy your golf vacation. There are no business meetings, no phone calls to bother, just you and your fantastic new golf clubs. The best experience you can give to your life is golfing. If you love playing golf, golf in Ireland will provide you with great golfing experiences.

Finding a good golf course does not seem to be hard at all in Ireland. There are lots of golf clubs to choose from. You can find golf courses with sunny beaches or with more moderate climate.

Here are some of the famous Irish golf courses

The Royal Dublin Golf Club:
The Royal Dublin Golf Club is a more than a century old golf course, most venerate and the second oldest golf course. This golf club covers a huge area of 230 acres and belongs to the Adare Manor Estate. Adare Golf Course was designed by Robert Trent Jones Sr. offering a magnificent parkland layout. This is one of the leading parkland courses in Ireland.

Beaufort Golf Club:
This golf course was founded only in 1995 but is fast becoming a play venue for all kind of golfers. Beaufort has been carved from natural terrain and lush with plant growth. Some characteristics of Beaufort Golf Course are the bunkering patterns, large contoured greens and generous fairways. Eighth hole is the jewel in the Beaufort crown. The beautiful green course bestow you a splendid scenery of the beautiful McGillycuddy Reeks mountain range. On this course each hole asks solemn questions of a golfer’s ability.

Druids Glen:
This club is located along side of the Fota Island, Mount Juliet and Carlow. Druids Glen hosted the Irish Open Golf Championship from 1996 to 1999, was awarded with the prestigious Hertz International Travel Awards. Due to its outstanding beauty the golf club area is called as “Heaven’s Reflex”.

Killarney Golf Club:
Killarney Golf Club comprises three top-class parklands – Lackabane, Mahony’s Point and Killeen Course. Killeen Course is the jewel of the Killarney golfing crown.

Ardfert Golf Club:
This Irish golf club is situated 15 miles north of Tralee and is the right place for people who are looking for an economical nine holer. The course is in existence from 1994 and has attracted thousands of visitors so far. It just measures 5700 yards, proving that a layout doesn’t have to be a monster to make it both interesting and challenging. Snacks are available for visitors in a clubhouse, nearby. These golf courses will not only make playing golf in Ireland interesting and challenging but also a memorable one.